What do ghosts do when they aren’t haunting? Go to outer space. Make lists. Window shop. Visit friends. Prank. Be bored. Haunt other ghosts. —Morrill, Tuck & Super Futures Haunt Quollective, Before Dispossession The ghost addresses us, interrogates us with its voice and its gaze; it’s a call from Otherness to which we must respond, even though we are unable to adequately respond. —Steven Shaviro, Spectres of Marx I am a queer, first­-generation Liberian-­American, multidisciplinary artist from Philadelphia. In my creative practice I use drawing, sculpture, writing, printmaking, and performance to meditate on Blackness in the United States and other sites of the African diaspora. I focus on the enduring ability of Black people to reinvent ourselves through inherited and appropriated visual culture and performance. Through my studio practice I study racial caricatures as hand-made memorabilia and mass-produced consumer goods. I recreate these objects through drawing, printmaking, and sculpture while considering my relationship with these Black Objects as a maker and as a racialized body, a black body. We exist together in the world and are subject to a racial imagination that seeks to produce, own, and destroy us.

What do ghosts do when they aren’t haunting? Go to outer space. Make lists. Window shop. Visit friends. Prank. Be bored. Haunt other ghosts.

—Morrill, Tuck & Super Futures Haunt Quollective, Before Dispossession

The ghost addresses us, interrogates us with its voice and its gaze; it’s a call from Otherness to which we must respond, even though we are unable to adequately respond.

—Steven Shaviro, Spectres of Marx

I am a queer, first­-generation Liberian-­American, multidisciplinary artist from Philadelphia. In my creative practice I use drawing, sculpture, writing, printmaking, and performance to meditate on Blackness in the United States and other sites of the African diaspora. I focus on the enduring ability of Black people to reinvent ourselves through inherited and appropriated visual culture and performance.

Through my studio practice I study racial caricatures as hand-made memorabilia and mass-produced consumer goods. I recreate these objects through drawing, printmaking, and sculpture while considering my relationship with these Black Objects as a maker and as a racialized body, a black body.

We exist together in the world and are subject to a racial imagination that seeks to produce, own, and destroy us.